Going to the Chapel April 3-18
Going to the Chapel April 3-18
There’s an all-star cast coming to the Cutting Edge Theatre. Celebrate an evening of fun and music With Betty Lou and her bridesmaids the week before the big date. Going to the Chapel will sure move you back to he past with the non stop hits of the 1960’s girl groups you all have known and loved thru the years. And this literally is a jukebox musical. You’ve got all the girl group Hits selling the show with song and Dance. The music shifts dramatically as well, from early girl groups like the Chiffons, the Shirelles, the Supremes – any number of big-name acts of the 1960s. They’re all part of “Going to the Chapel,” which runs April 3-18th , and it’s a fun romp through a great decade for a jukebox musical. “Going to the Chapel” is a fun trip down memory lane.
Box heading
Mrs. Stancliffe’s Rose Cottage Bed & Breakfast has been successful for many years. Her Guests (nearly all women) return year after year. Her next door neighbor, the elderly, silver-tongued, Bud “Bud the Stud” Davis believes they come to spend time with him in romantic liaisons. The prim and proper Mrs. Stancliffe steadfastly denies this, but really doesn’t do anything to prevent it. She reluctantly accepts the fact that “Bud the Stud” is, in fact, good for business. Her other neighbor and would-be suitor Henry Mitchell is a retired chemist who has developed a blue pill called “Venusia,” after Venus the goddess of love, to increase the libido of menopausal women. The pill has not been tested.
Chicago the Musical May 22- June 11 2015
Chicago the Musical May 22- June 11 2015
The musical Chicago is based on a play of the same name by reporter Maurine Dallas Watkins, who was assigned to cover the 1924 trials of accused murderers Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner for the Chicago Tribune. In the early 1920s, Chicago's press and public became riveted by the subject of homicides committed by women. Several high-profile cases arose, which generally involved women killing their lovers or husbands. These cases were tried against a backdrop of changing views of women in the Jazz age, and a long string of acquittals by Cook County juries of women murderesses (jurors at the time were all men, and convicted murderers generally faced death by hanging). A lore arose that, in Chicago, feminine or attractive women could not be convicted. The Chicago Tribune generally took a pro-prosecution "hang-them-high" stance, while still presenting the details of these women's lives. Its rivals at the Hearst papers were more pro-defendant, and employed what were derisively called "sob-sisters" – women reporters who focused on the plight, attractiveness, redemption, or grace of the women defendants. Regardless of stance, the press covered several of these women as celebrities.
Auditions for Mulan Jr
Auditions for Mulan Jr
April 2015

Slidell's Most Innovative and Intimate Theater